home | login | register | DMCA | contacts | help | donate |      

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я


my bookshelf | genres | recommend | rating of books | rating of authors | reviews | new | форум | collections | читалки | авторам | add

A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol.I

A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol.I
Title: A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol.I
Author:
Оценка: 4.5 of 5, readers votes - 23
Serie:A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels
Genre: historical
Annotation:GENERAL HISTORY AND COLLECTION OF VOYAGES AND TRAVELS, ARRANGED IN SYSTEMATIC ORDER: FORMING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF NAVIGATION, DISCOVERY, AND COMMERCE, BY SEA AND LAND, FROM THE EARLIEST AGES TO THE PRESENT TIME. BY ROBERT KERR, F.R.S. & F.A.S. EDIN. ILLUSTRATED BY MAPS AND CHARTS. VOL. I.
Table of Contents:

hide Table of Contents

  1. A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. I by Robert Kerr
  2. PREFACE
  3. GENERAL PLAN OF THE WORK
  4. PART I. VOYAGES AND TRAVELS OF DISCOVERY, FROM THE ERA OF ALFRED, KING OF ENGLAND, IN THE NINTH CENTURY; TO THE ERA OF DON HENRY, PRINCE OF PORTUGAL, AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY
  5. CHAPTER I. Discoveries in the time of Alfred King of England, in the ninth century of the Christian era
  6. INTRODUCTION
  7. SECTION I. Discovery of Iceland by the Norwegians in the Ninth Century 1
  8. SECTION II. Voyages of Ohthere to the White Sea and the Baltic, in the Ninth Century 2
  9. SECTION III. Remarks by J. M. Forster, respecting the situation of Sciringes-heal and Haethum 20
  10. SECTION IV. Voyage of Wulfstan in the Baltic as related to Alfred 24
  11. SECTION IVa. Voyage of Sighelm and Athelstan to India, in the reign of Alfred King of England, in 883
  12. SECTION V. Travels of John Erigena to Athens, in the Ninth Century 43
  13. SECTION VI. Geography of the Known World, in the Ninth Century as described by King Alfred 44
  14. SECTION VII. The Travels of Andrew Leucander, or Whiteman, in the Eleventh Century 131
  15. SECTION VIII. The Voyage of Swanus to Jerusalem in 1052 132
  16. SECTION IX. A Voyage of three Ambassadors from England to Constantinople and the East, about the year 1056
  17. SECTION X. Pilgrimage of Alured, Bishop of Worcester, to Jerusalem, in 1058 134
  18. SECTION XI. Pilgrimage of Ingulphus Abbot of Croyland, to Jerusalem, in 1064 135
  19. CHAPTER II. Original Discovery of Greenland by the Icelanders 136
  20. CHAPTER III. Early Discovery of Winland by the Icelanders, about A.D. 1001 138
  21. CHAPTER IV. Travels of two Mahomedans in India and China, in the Ninth Century 141
  22. INTRODUCTION
  23. SECTION I. Original Account of India and China, by a Mahomedan Traveller of the Ninth Century
  24. SECTION II. C ommentary upon the foregoing Account, by Abu Zeid al Hasan of Siraff
  25. CHAPTER V. Travels of Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela, through Europe, Asia, and Africa, from Spain to China, between A.D. 1160 and 1173
  26. CHAPTER VI. Travels of an Englishman into Tartary, and thence into Poland, Hungary, and Germany, in 1243
  27. CHAPTER VII. Sketch of the Revolutions in Tartary
  28. CHAPTER VIII. The Travels of John de Plano Carpini and other Friars, sent about the year 1246, as ambassadors from Pope Innocent IV, to the great Khan of the Moguls or Tartars
  29. INTRODUCTION
  30. SECTION I. Introductory Epistle by John de Plano Carpini
  31. SECTION II. Of the first Mission of Friars Predicants and Minorites to the Tartars
  32. SECTION III. Of the Situation and Quality of the Land of the Tartars, from Carpini
  33. SECTION IV. Of the Appearance, Dress, and Manner of Living of the Tartars
  34. SECTION V. Of their Good and Bad Customs
  35. SECTION VI. Of the Laws and Customs of the Tartars
  36. SECTION VII. Of their Superstitious Traditions
  37. SECTION VIII. Of the Beginning of their Empire
  38. SECTION IX. Of the Mutual Victories of the Mongals and Cathayans
  39. SECTION X. Of the Wars of the Mongals against the Greater and Lesser India
  40. SECTION XI. Of Monstrous Men like Dogs, and of the Conquest of Burithabeth
  41. SECTION XII. How the Mongals were repulsed at the Caspian Mountains, by Men dwelling in Caves
  42. SECTION XIII. Of the death of Zingis, and concerning his Sons, and the Tartar Dukes or Princes
  43. SECTION XIV. Of the Power of the Emperors, and of his Dukes
  44. SECTION XV. Of the Election of the Emperor Occoday, and of the Expedition of Duke Bathy
  45. SECTION XVI. Of the Expedition of Duke Cyrpodan
  46. SECTION XVII. Of the Military conduct of the Tartars
  47. SECTION XVIII. How the Tartars ought to be resisted
  48. SECTION XIX. Of the Journey of Friar John de Plano Carpini, to the First Guard of the Tartars 236
  49. SECTION XX. Of his first Reception by the Tartars
  50. SECTION XXI. His Reception at the Court of Corrensa
  51. SECTION XXII. The Reception of Carpini at the Court of Baatu
  52. SECTION XXIII. The Journey through the Land of Comania, and of the Kangittae
  53. SECTION XXIV. The arrival of Carpini at the first Station of the new Emperor
  54. SECTION XXV. The Arrival of Carpini at the Court of the Emperor elect
  55. SECTION XXVI. Of the Reception of the papal Nuncios at the court of Kujak, or Cuyne-Khan
  56. SECTION XXVII. Of the Exaltation of Cuyne as Emperor
  57. SECTION XXVIII. Of the Age and Demeanour of Cuyne, and of his Seal
  58. SECTION XXIX. Of the Admission of the Papal and other Envoys to the Emperor
  59. SECTION XXX. Of the Separation between the Emperor and his Mother, and of the Death of Jeroslaus Duke of Russia
  60. SECTION XXXI. How the Friars, in the presence of the Emperor, interchanged Letters
  61. SECTION XXXII. The Papal Envoys receive a Licence to depart
  62. SECTION XXXIII. The return of the Papal Envoys to Europe
  63. CHAPTER IX. Travels of William de Rubruquis into Tartary, about the year 1253 253
  64. INTRODUCTION
  65. SECTION I. Commencement of the Journey
  66. SECTION II. Of the Tartars and their Houses
  67. SECTION III. Of their Beds and Drinking-cups
  68. SECTION IV. Of their Kinds of Drink, and Fashion of Drinking
  69. SECTION V. Of their Food
  70. SECTION VI. How they make the Drink called Cosmos
  71. SECTION VII. Of the Beasts they eat, of their Garments, and of their Hunting parties
  72. SECTION VIII. Of the Fashion of their Hair, and the Ornaments of their Women
  73. SECTION IX. Of the Duties and Labours of the Women, and of their Nuptials
  74. SECTION X. Of their Laws and Judgments, and of their Death and Burial
  75. SECTION XI. Of our first Entering among the Tartars, and of their Ingratitude
  76. SECTION XII. Of the Court of Zagathai, and how the Christians drink no Cosmos
  77. SECTION XIII. How some Alanians visited them on the Eve of Pentecost
  78. SECTION XIV. Of a Saracen who desired to be Baptized, and of men who seemed Lepers
  79. SECTION XV. Of our Distresses, and of the Comanian funerals
  80. SECTION XVI. Of the Dominions and Subjects of Sartach
  81. SECTION XVII. Of the Magnificence of the Court of Sartach
  82. SECTION XVIII. They are ordered to proceed to Baatu, the Father of Sartach
  83. SECTION XIX. Of the Reverence shewn by Sartach, Mangu-khan, and Ken-chan, to the Christians
  84. SECTION XX. Of the Russians, Hungarians, Alanians, and of the Caspian
  85. SECTION XXI. Of the Court of Baatu, and our Entertainment there
  86. SECTION XXII. The Journey to the Court of Mangu-khan
  87. SECTION XXIII. Of the River Jaic or Ural, and of sundry Regions and Nations
  88. SECTION XXIV. Of the Hunger, Thirst, and other Miseries we endured
  89. SECTION XXV. Of the Execution of Ban, and concerning the residence of certain Germans
  90. SECTION XXVI. How the Nestorians and Mahometans are mixed with Idolaters
  91. SECTION XXVII. Of their Temples and Idols, and the Worship of their Gods
  92. SECTION XXVIII. Of sundry Nations, and of certain People who used to eat their Parents
  93. SECTION XXIX. Of Cailac, and the Country of the Naymans
  94. SECTION XXX. Description of the Country of the Naymans, with an Account of the Death of Ken-khan and of his Wife and Eldest Son
  95. SECTION XXXI. Arrival at the Court of Mangu-khan
  96. SECTION XXXII. The Introduction of Rubruquis to Mangu-khan
  97. SECTION XXXIII. Of a Woman of Lorain, and a Goldsmith of Paris, and several other Christians, whom they found at the Court of Mangu-kkan
  98. SECTION XXXIV. Of a Grand Feast given by Mangu-khan and of the Ceremonies of the Nestorians
  99. SECTION XXXV. Of a great Cure performed by the Armenian monk Sergius, on one of the Wives of Mangu-khan
  100. SECTION XXXVI. Account of the Country under the Dominion of the Great Khan of the Manners and Customs of his Subjects; of a Wonderful Piece of Mechanism, constructed by a French Goldsmith; and of the
  101. SECTION XXXVII. Of certain disputes between Rubruquis and the Saracens and Idolaters, at the Court of Mangu-khan, respecting Religion
  102. SECTION XXXVIII. The last audience of Rubruquis with Mangu-khan, and the letter he received for the King of France
  103. SECTION XXXIX. The departure of Rubruquis from the Court of Mangu-khan, and his journey by Saray and other places, to Tripoly in Syria
  104. CHAPTER X. Travels of Haitho, Prince of Armenia, in Tartary, in 1254 331
  105. SECTION I. Introduction
  106. SECTION II. Geographical Notices of the East in the Thirteenth Century, by Haitho
  107. CHAPTER XI. Travels of Marco Polo, through Tartary, China, the Islands of India, and most of Asia, from A. D. 1260 to 1295
  108. SECTION I. Introductory General Account of the whole Travels, from the commencement of the first Journey of Nicolo and Maffei Polo, in 1260, to their final return along with Marco to Venice, in 1295
  109. SECTION II. Description of Armenia the Lesser, of the country of the Turks of Greater Armenia, Zorzania, the kingdom of Mosul, of the cities of Bagdat and Tauris, and account of a strange Miracle
  110. SECTION III. Of the Country of Persia, the Cities of Jasdi, Cermam and Camandu, and the Province of Reobarle
  111. SECTION IV. Account of several other Countries, and their Principal Curiosities
  112. SECTION V. History of the Assassins, and the manner in which their Prince was killed; with the description of several other Countries
  113. SECTION VI. Of the city of Samarcand, the town of Lop, the Great Desert in its Neighbourhood, and other remarkable Passages
  114. SECTION VII. Of the Province of Chamil and several other Countries on the road from thence to the City of Ezina; and of another great Desert
  115. SECTION VIII. Of the City of Caracarum and of the Tartars, with some account of their History, Monarchs, and Manners
  116. SECTION IX. Of the vast Countries to the North of Tartary, and many other curious Particulars
  117. SECTION X. Of the great power of Kublai-khan and various circumstances respecting his Family, Government, and Dominions
  118. SECTION XI. Account of the Imperial City of Cambalu, and the Court of the Great Khan, or Emperor of the Tartars
  119. SECTION XII. Of the Magnificence of the Court of the Great Khan, and of the Manners and Customs of his Subjects
  120. SECTION XIII. Some Account of the Provinces of Kathay, or Northern China, and of other neighbouring Countries subject to the Great Khan
  121. SECTION XIV. An account of Thibet, and several other Provinces, with the Observations made by the Author in passing through them
  122. SECTION XV. An account of the Kingdom of Mangi, and the manner of its Reduction under the dominion of the Great Khan; together with some Notices of its various Provinces and Cities
  123. SECTION XVI. Of the noble City of Quinsai, and of the vast Revenues drawn from thence by the Great Khan
  124. SECTION XVII. Of the island of Zipangu, and of the unsuccessful attempts made by the Tartars for its Conquest
  125. SECTION XVIII. Account of Various Countries, Provinces, Islands, and Cities in the Indies
  126. SECTION XIX. Of the Island of Ceylon, and various parts of Hither India
  127. SECTION XX. Of the Kingdom of Murfili, and the Diamond Mines, and some other Countries of India
  128. SECTION XXI. Of Madagascar, Ethiopia, Abyssinia, and several other Countries 528
  129. CHAPTER XII. Travels of Oderic of Portenau, into China and the East, in 1318 536
  130. INTRODUCTION
  131. SECTION I. The Commencement of the Travels of Oderic
  132. SECTION II. Of the Manners of the Chaldeans, and concerning India
  133. SECTION III. Of the Martyrdom of the Friars 550
  134. SECTION IV. Of the Miracles performed by the four Martyrs
  135. SECTION V. Of the places where Pepper grows, and in what Manner it is procured
  136. SECTION VI. Of a Strange Idol, and of certain Customs and Ceremonies
  137. SECTION VII. Of certain Trees which produce Meal, Honey, Wine, and Poison
  138. SECTION VIII. Of vast multitudes of Fish, which throw themselves on the dry Land
  139. SECTION IX. Of the Island of Ceylon, and of the Mountain where Adam mourned the Death of Abel
  140. SECTION X. Of Upper India, and the Province of Mancy 567
  141. SECTION XI. Of the City of Fuko, or Foquien
  142. SECTION XII. Of a Monastery, having many different kinds of Animals on a certain Hill
  143. SECTION XIII. Of the city of Cambalu
  144. SECTION XIV. Of the Magnificence of the Great Khan
  145. SECTION XV. Of the Inns established over the whole Empire, for the use of Travellers
  146. SECTION XVI. Of the four Solemn Feasts held yearly by the Great Khan
  147. SECTION XVII. Of various Provinces and Cities of the East
  148. SECTION XVIII. Of a certain Rich Man, who was Fed by fifty Virgins
  149. SECTION XIX. Of the Old Man of the Mountain
  150. SECTION XX. Of several wonderful things in those parts
  151. SECTION XXI. Of the Honour and Reverence shewn to the Great Khan
  152. SECTION XXII. Conclusion of the Travels, and Account of the Death of Friar Oderic
  153. CHAPTER XIII. Travels of Sir John Mandeville into the East, in 1322 584
  154. CHAPTER XIV. Itinerary of Pegoletti, between Asof and China, in 1355 585
  155. CHAPTER XV. Voyages of Nicolo and Antonio Zeno in 1380 598
  156. INTRODUCTION
  157. SECTION I. Narrative of Nicolo Zeno
  158. SECTION II. Sequel of the Narrative by Antonio Zeno
  159. CHAPTER XVI. Travels of John Schildtberger into Tartary, in 1394 619
  160. CHAPTER XVII. Travels of the Ambassadors of Mirza Shah Rokh, King of Persia, from Herat to Khanbalek in Katkay, in 1419
  161. INTRODUCTION
  162. SECTION I. The Journey of the Ambassadors from Herat to Khanbalek, and their reception at the Court of the Emperor of Kathay
  163. SECTION II. The several Audiences of the Ambassadors, their Entertainments, Presents, and Return
  164. CHAPTER XVIII. Voyage and Travels of Pietro Quirini into Norway, in 1431 688
  165. INTRODUCTION
  166. SECTION I. Voyage and Shipwreck of Quirini
  167. SECTION II. Preservation of Quirini on the Coast of Norway, and Residence In the Isle of Rostoe
  168. SECTION III. Voyage from Rostoe to Drontheim, and journey thence into Sweden
  169. CHAPTER XIX. Travels of Josaphat Barbaro, Ambassador from Venice to Tanna, now called Asof, in 1436 698
  170. INTRODUCTION
  171. Notes


Rate this book  


Read this book now: A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol.I

Download (422k) in formats: fb2, epub, mobi, txt, html

close [X]

close [X]


Reviews


Enter your name:     Rate this book

Enter your comments or review:


получать комментарии о книге A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol.I на e-mail

Anti-spam code Anti spam Capcha