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INT. O'REILLY HOUSE - RODERICK'S BEDROOM - EARLY MORNING

Roderick enters.

RODERICK (V.O.)

Into a pretty nest of villains, indeed, was I plunged! When I returned to my bed-chamber, a few hours later, it seemed as if all my misfortunes were to break on me at once.

Valise open, wardrobe lying on the ground, and Roderick's keys in the possession of O'Reilly and his wife.

CAPTAIN O'REILLY

Whom have I been harboring in my house? Who are you, sirrah?

RODERICK

Sirrah! Sirrah, I am as good a gentleman as any in Ireland!

CAPTAIN O'REILLY

You're an impostor, young man, a schemer, a deceiver!

RODERICK

Repeat the words again, and I run you through the body.

CAPTAIN O'REILLY

Tut, tut! I can play at fencing as well as you, Mr. Roderick James. Ah! You change color, do you? Your secret is known, is it? You come like a viper into the bosom of innocent families; you represent yourself as the heir to my friends the O'Higgins of Castle O'Higgins; I introduce you to the nobility and gentry of this methropolis; I take you to my tradesmen, who give you credit. I accept your note for near two hundred pounds, and what do I find? A fraud.

He holds up the name, Roderick James, printed on the linen.

CAPTAIN O'REILLY

Not Master O'Higgins of Watertown, but Roderick James of the devil only knows where...

Captain O'Reilly gathers up the linen clothes, silver toilet articles, and the rest of Roderick's gear.

RODERICK

Hark ye, Mr. O'Reilly, I will tell you why I was obliged to alter my name, which is James and the best name in Ireland. I changed it, sir, because, on the day before I came to Dublin, I killed a man in deadly combat -- an Englishman, sir, and a Captain in His Majesty's service; and if you offer to let or hinder me in the slightest way, the same arm which destroyed him is ready to punish you.

So saying, Roderick draws his sword like lightning, and giving a "ha, ha!" and a stamp with his foot, lunges it within an inch of O'Reilly's heart, who starts back and turns deadly pale, while his wife, with a scream, flings herself between them.

MRS. O'REILLY

Dearest Roderick -- be pacified. O'Reilly, you don't want the poor child's blood. Let him escape -- in Heaven's name, let him go.

CAPTAIN O'REILLY

(sulkily)

He may go hang for me, and he's better be off quickly, for I shall go to the magistrate if I see him again.

O'Reilly exits. His wife sits down on the bed and begins to cry.


EXT. STREET - OUTSIDE OREILLY HOUSE - DAWN | Barry Lindon | EXT. DUBLIN STREET - DAY