home | login | register | DMCA | contacts | help |      
mobile | donate |

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


my bookshelf | genres | recommend | rating of books | rating of authors | reviews | new | | collections | | | add
fantasy
space fantasy
fantasy is horrors
heroic
prose
  military
  child
  russian
detective
  action
  child
  ironical
  historical
  political
western
adventure
adventure (child)
child's stories
love
religion
antique
Scientific literature
biography
business
home pets
animals
art
history
computers
linguistics
mathematics
religion
home_garden
sport
technique
publicism
philosophy
chemistry
close

Loading...


Meeeeeeeeeee!

On Wednesdays at the Princeton Graduate College, various people would come in to give talks. The speakers were often interesting, and in the discussions after the talks we used to have a lot of fun. For instance, one guy in our school was very strongly anti-Catholic, so he passed out questions in advance for people to ask a religious speaker, and we gave the speaker a hard time.

Another time somebody gave a talk about poetry. He talked about the structure of the poem and the emotions that come with it; he divided everything up into certain kinds of classes. In the discussion that came afterwards, he said, Isnt that the same as in mathematics, Dr. Eisenhart?

Dr. Eisenhart was the dean of the graduate school and a great professor of mathematics. He was also very clever. He said, Id like to know what Dick Feynman thinks about it in reference to theoretical physics. He was always putting me on in this kind of situation.

I got up and said, Yes, its very closely related. In theoretical physics, the analog of the word is the mathematical formula, the analog of the structure of the poem is the interrelationship of the theoretical bling-bling with the so-and soand I went through the whole thing, making a perfect analogy. The speakers eyes were beaming with happiness.

Then I said, It seems to me that no matter what you say about poetry, I could find a way of making up an analog with any subject, just as I did for theoretical physics. I dont consider such analogs meaningful.

In the great big dining hall with stained-glass windows, where we always ate, in our steadily deteriorating academic gowns, Dean Eisenhart would begin each dinner by saying grace in Latin. After dinner he would often get up and make some announcements. One night Dr. Eisenhart got up and said, Two weeks from now, a professor of psychology is coming to give a talk about hypnosis. Now, this professor thought it would be much better if we had a real demonstration of hypnosis instead of just talking about it. Therefore he would like some people to volunteer to be hypnotized.

I get all excited: Theres no question but that Ive got to find out about hypnosis. This is going to be terrific!

Dean Eisenhart went on to say that it would be good if three or four people would volunteer so that the hypnotist could try them out first to see which ones would be able to be hypnotized, so hed like to urge very much that we apply for this. (Hes wasting all this time, for Gods sake!)

Eisenhart was down at one end of the hall, and I was way down at the other end, in the back. There were hundreds of guys there. I knew that everybody was going to want to do this, and I was terrified that he wouldnt see me because I was so far back. I just had to get in on this demonstration!

Finally Eisenhart said, And so I would like to ask if there are going to be any volunteers

I raised my hand and shot out of my seat, screaming as loud as I could, to make sure that he would hear me: MEEEEEEEEEEE!

He heard me all right, because there wasnt another soul. My voice reverberated throughout the hallit was very embarrassing. Eisenharts immediate reaction was, Yes, of course, I knew you would volunteer, Mr. Feynman, but I was wondering if there would be anybody else.

Finally a few other guys volunteered, and a week before the demonstration the man came to practice on us, to see if any of us would be good for hypnosis. I knew about the phenomenon, but I didnt know what it was like to be hypnotized.

He started to work on me and soon I got into a position where he said, You cant open your eyes.

I said to myself, I bet I could open my eyes, but I dont want to disturb the situation: Lets see how much further it goes. It was an interesting situation: Youre only slightly fogged out, and although youve lost a little bit, youre pretty sure you could open your eyes. But of course, youre not opening your eyes, so in a sense you cant do it.

He went through a lot of stuff and decided that I was pretty good.

When the real demonstration came he had us walk on stage, and he hypnotized us in front of the whole Princeton Graduate College. This time the effect was stronger; I guess I had learned how to become hypnotized. The hypnotist made various demonstrations, having me do things that I couldnt normally do, and at the end he said that after I came out of hypnosis, instead of returning to my seat directly, which was the natural way to go, I would walk all the way around the room and go to my seat from the back.

All through the demonstration I was vaguely aware of what was going on, and cooperating with the things the hypnotist said, but this time I decided, Damn it, enough is enough! Im gonna go straight to my seat.

When it was time to get up and go off the stage, I started to walk straight to my seat. But then an annoying feeling came over me: I felt so uncomfortable that I couldnt continue. I walked all the way around the hall.

I was hypnotized in another situation some time later by a woman. While I was hypnotized she said, Im going to light a match, blow it out, and immediately touch the back of your hand with it. You will feel no pain.

I thought, Baloney! She took a match, lit it, blew it out, and touched it to the back of my hand. It felt slightly warm. My eyes were closed throughout all of this, but I was thinking, Thats easy. She lit one match, but touched a different match to my hand. Theres nothin to that; its a fake!

When I came out of the hypnosis and looked at the back of my hand, I got the biggest surprise: There was a burn on the back of my hand. Soon a blister grew, and it never hurt at all, even when it broke.

So I found hypnosis to be a very interesting experience. All the time youre saying to yourself, I could do that, but I wontwhich is just another way of saying that you cant.


Surely Youre Joking, Mr. Feynman! | Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman: Adventures of a Curious Character | A Map of the Cat?







Loading...